19.08.2019
 Oedipus - Don Taylor swift Adaption Article

Place yourself back in towards the times of Greek tragedy and culture, the wonderful palace doors overlooking the Kingdom and the elegant, admirable dresses. Here there is a setting of " Oedipus the King” written by Sophocles, adapted in 1986 by Don Taylor. Taylor swift adapts this version very well, highlighting the main themes and significant symbolising Sophocles might have used in the play remarkably. Also this individual still will keep the representation of the Ancient greek culture of the play as well. Like almost all Greek tragedies Oedipus is placed around only one setting, here it's beyond the Kingdom in which the citizens of Thebes as well as the chorus from the Theban councillors all collect in hope of Oedipus's wisdom. The stage is placed out in a set stage, while using kingdom stage left plus the entrance of visitors from outside the Empire stage right reflecting after status inside the play. At the beginning the residents all gather from about the palace, each group of residents seem to be symbolising a significant ten years in the past wherever something incredibly devastating while happened. They show this kind of in their poor movement and aged halloween costumes. However they will be complied by a priest who have seems to be leading them to the Palace, it's a very tragic scene as we emotionally feel the negativity with the citizens in the Kingdom, aurally we notice a very unknown in some ways terrifying music that adds to the mysteriousness. As well as the night and misty setting all of us visually locate ourselves in, symbolising morning hours. Suddenly theirs a change in tone, the frightening loud sound of your Gong is presented, and a light starts to gleam in. This is the first sighting we see of Oedipus played by Michaela Pennington, the tantan is always utilized to signify his exaggerated access and the comparison in lighting from the beginning could possibly be seen as sunlight raising symbolising Oedipus arising from the structure for his ‘grand entrance'. When he really does appear we also view the contrast of colors visually, this individual enters such a gloomy environment dressed in light...